BTB 37: Focus on 5300

Attachment product manager, Duane Barlow, talks about Tigercat’s high capacity bunching saw line-up and the new 5300 bunching saw.

Attachment product manager, Duane Barlow, talks about Tigercat’s high capacity bunching saw line-up and the new 5300 bunching saw.

BTB: Tigercat’s latest addition to the bunching head line-up is the 5300. How did the model come about?

DB: The demand for the 5300 bunching saw came from Brazil. Our customer, International Paper, asked for an additional capacity of two trees to consistently cut ten trees per swing cycle – cutting five rows across and back. In larger trees, the 5000 saw was sometimes short of capacity to achieve the full cycle. The 5600 saw would have added too much weight and we could not effectively gain the additional accumulation with the existing 5000 design.

Tigercat 5300 bunching saw

Tigercat 5300 bunching saw

DB: The 5300 bunching saw uses the existing 5600 accumulating arm. The spindle and bearings are common to the 5400, 5500, 5600 and 5700. The cylinders are common to the 5600. The 5300 uses the 5400 saw blade, which is smaller in diameter than the 5600 blade. It will consume less fuel and recover more quickly than the larger blade. Unique components on the 5300 include the clamp arm, frame, guards and skis. We tried to offer as much parts commonality as possible. The saw is approximately250 kg (550 lb) lighter than the 5600 would have been if it had been adapted for track carriers.

BTB: Describe the typical uses and applications for the 5000 and 5600 saws.

DB: For wheeled machines, the 5000 is lighter, more compact and better suited for thinning applications. We tried the 5600 saw on the 718 series feller bunchers in thinning and it was objectionably heavy, too big for the required thinning dexterity and was a poor match for the machine overall. The 5000 saw is perfectly matched to the stability limitations of the lightweight 718E with its compact wheelbase, particularly with the smaller tires on narrow-offset wheels common for thinning. The 5600 saw is meant for maximum capacity bunching with a suitably equipped carrier. It is very well suited to the 720E and 724E drive-to-tree bunchers but is too heavy for track machines.

BTB: Why is the 5300 saw only available for track machines?

DB: We already have the 5000 and 5600 saws. Those accustomed to the 5600 would not accept lower bunching capacity. Those who are running a 5000 would likely object to loss in dexterity and machine balance with the heavier 5300.